Asia

Author(s)

Austin ClowesChip Barber

In this episode of the WRI Podcast, Lawrence MacDonald sits down with Chip Barber and Austin Clowes of the Forest Legality Initiative to talk about their work on sustainability in the guitar industry.

The music industry sells millions of guitars a year, and the instrument is integral to musical traditions from blues and rock ‘n roll to flamenco and classical music. These traditions rely on specific types of wood, known as tonewoods, to produce the distinctive timbre of the guitar.

Author(s)

Austin Clowes

Rosewood is sought for use in guitar fretboards like this one. Bill Selak/Flickr

 

 

 

 

Welcome to the fourth installment of WRI’s six-part blog series on the future of tonewoods, the woods used in guitars and other musical instruments. In each installment, we look at a different species of tree used for a certain part of the guitar. Each wood presents its own challenges and possibilities surrounding sustainable harvest. 

Display Name: 
Meaghan Parker
Affiliation: 
World Resources Institute

The Forest Legality Alliance convened its members and partners on July 6 and 7 in the new Harmon Conference Center at World Resources Institute headquarters in Washington, D.C.  With the 17th meeting of the Conference of the Parties to the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES) scheduled for the end of September, most of the meeting was focused on the growing profile of timber species in the CITES convention.  The July meeting was the last FLA gathering to be convened under WRI’s C

Author(s)

Emily Kaldjian

The 14th semi-annual membership meeting of the Forest Legality Alliance took place in December 2015. It was attended by 104 people from 78 different companies, NGOs, and government bodies and lively discussion was held on three main topics: timber legality in the Congo Basin, updates on the Lacey Act in the guitar industry, and the recent Lumber Liquidators Lacey Act case. Short summaries are below.

Panel 1: Timber Legality in the Congo Basin: Independent Monitors (IM) and the Impact of the EUTR and FLEGT VPA Negotiations

Author(s)

Emily Kaldjian

The United States’ largest hardwood flooring retailer was sentenced on February 1, 2016 after pleading guilty in October to importing illegally harvested timber from areas including forests in the Russian Far East. Lumber Liquidators will pay $7.8 million in criminal fines, $1.23 million in community service payments and will forfeit nearly $1 million in assets for importing illegally sourced hardwood flooring.

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