North America

Author(s)

Austin ClowesChip Barber

In this episode of the WRI Podcast, Lawrence MacDonald sits down with Chip Barber and Austin Clowes of the Forest Legality Initiative to talk about their work on sustainability in the guitar industry.

The music industry sells millions of guitars a year, and the instrument is integral to musical traditions from blues and rock ‘n roll to flamenco and classical music. These traditions rely on specific types of wood, known as tonewoods, to produce the distinctive timbre of the guitar.

Author(s)

Austin Clowes

A twisting branch of mahogany. Photo by Kinnla/Flickr

 

 

Welcome to the final installment of WRI’s six-part blog series on the future of tonewoods, the woods used in guitars and other musical instruments. In each installment, we look at a different species of tree used for a certain part of the guitar. Each wood presents its own challenges and possibilities surrounding sustainable harvest.

Author(s)

Austin Clowes

Bigleaf maple forest. Photo by Dru!/Flickr

 

 

 

Welcome to the third installment of WRI’s six-part blog series on the future of tonewoods, the woods used in guitars and other musical instruments. In each installment, we look at a different species of tree used for a certain part of the guitar. Each wood presents its own challenges and possibilities surrounding sustainable harvest. 

Author(s)

Austin ClowesChip BarberEmily Kaldjian

Worker routs the top of an acoustic guitar. Photo credit: RA Beattie/Musicians for Forests

 

 

When you listen to a guitar, what you hear is not the strings. It’s the wood – known as tonewood – that vibrates, defines tone and creates sound.

Display Name: 
Meaghan Parker
Affiliation: 
World Resources Institute

The Forest Legality Alliance convened its members and partners on July 6 and 7 in the new Harmon Conference Center at World Resources Institute headquarters in Washington, D.C.  With the 17th meeting of the Conference of the Parties to the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES) scheduled for the end of September, most of the meeting was focused on the growing profile of timber species in the CITES convention.  The July meeting was the last FLA gathering to be convened under WRI’s C

Author(s)

Emily Kaldjian

A wood buyer from Washington State and his lumber mill, J&L Tonewoods, were indicted last week on charges of purchasing illegally harvested big leaf maples from the Gifford Pinchot National Forest in violation of the Lacey Act. The act bans illegal wildlife and timber trafficking, and the seven counts of the indictment are the first alleging violations within the United States.

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